Civics 

2014-15

Semester Course

 

Civics Units
Unit I American Citizenship - What is Civics? Chapter #1 - 2 Weeks
  The Constitution & Bill of Rights Chapters #3 & #4 - 3 Weeks
  The Civil Rights Movement Chapter #4-4 - 2 Weeks
  Citizenship:  Duties & Responsibilities Chapter #5 - 2 Weeks
     
Unit II Political Parties Chapter #9 - 2 Weeks
  Voting & Elections Chapters #10 & #11 - 2 Weeks
     
Unit III State Government:  South Dakota Executive, Legislative, and Judicial Branches Chapter #12 - 2 Weeks
  South Dakota Mock Legislature 1 Week
  Local Government:  City Government & School Boards Chapters #13 & #14 - 2 Weeks
  Current Events/Local Issues (Debate/Discussion Throughout the Semester).
Civics Weekly Lesson Plans 
Civics: The Study of Citizenship and Government  
October 27th - October 31st
Monday - 
Debate - Same-sex Marriage & Abortion
*Draw and Divide into two debate teams - Discuss the topics.
*Hand in Research Papers for each debate topic.
Assignment:  Illustrated Amendments (Due Tuesday).
Tuesday-
Discuss Amendments #4-#10 (Handout - Too Young to Die).
Review #4-2 Questions
Illustrated Amendments Poster (Due Today).
Assignment:   Death Penalty Debate (should we keep the Death Penalty/is the death penalty a form of cruel & unusual punishment?)
Wednesday-
Discuss Amendments #4-#10 (Quiz tomorrow)
Complete Research/Paper on the Death Penalty(Due Tomorrow)
Assignment:  Bill of Rights Quiz
Thursday-
Bill of Rights Quiz (25 points)
Debate Amendment #8 - Cruel and Unusual Punishment
*Parent-Teacher Conferences - 3:00-9:00PM
Assignment:  No Assignment
Friday-
No School (Parent-Teacher Conferences Thursday Night)

STUDENT EDITION LINK: 

TEXTBOOK:    CIVICS TODAY – CITIZENSHIP, ECONOMICS, & YOU (copyright – 2008)

2010 Census Bureau

 

Core High School Civics (Government) – South Dakota Content Standards

Standards, Supporting Skills, and Examples

Indicator 1: Analyze forms and purposes of government in relationship to the

needs of citizens and societies including the impact of historical events, ideals, and

documents.

 

I.       Bloom’s Taxonomy

·         Level Standard, Supporting Skills, and Examples

(Analysis)

1.      9-12.C.1.1. Students are able to explain the characteristics of

various forms of government.

Example: Democracies (direct and indirect);

Totalitarian/Authoritarian (dictatorships, absolute monarchy)

• Geographic distribution of power

Examples: unitary, federal, confederation

• The relationship between the legislative and executive

branches

Examples: presidential, parliamentary

• The number of citizens who may participate

(Evaluation)

2.      9-12.C.1.2. Students are able to determine the influence of

major historical documents and ideals on the formation of the

United States government.

Examples: documents - Magna Carta, Petition of Rights,

English Bill of Rights, Mayflower Compact, British Colonial

legislation (Intolerable Acts, Stamp Act, Writs of Assistance),

Articles of Confederation, Colonial/early state constitutions,

Declaration of Independence

Examples: ideals – Greek and Roman governments, League

of Iroquois Confederation, Social Contract

Examples: philosophers - Locke, Hobbes, Rousseau,

Montesquieu, Machiavelli

(Knowledge)

3.      9-12.C.1.3. Students are able to identify the principles of the

American Constitution.

• Separation of Powers/Checks and Balances

Examples: legislative, executive, judicial

Example: Describe the structures, functions, and powers

of the branches of government.

• Federalism-division of power among national, state, local,

and tribal

• Limited Government (Rule of law/Constitutionalism)

• Popular Sovereignty

• Judicial review

Examples: Landmark decisions of the United States

Supreme Court (Marbury v. Madison, Miranda v.

Arizona, Plessey v. Ferguson, Brown v. Board of

Education, Roe v. Wade)

• Amendment process

• Rationale for constitutional amendments and the conflicts

they address

 

(Comprehension)

4.      9-12.C.1.4. Students are able to explain the principles of

American democracy.

• Fundamental worth of the individual

• Equality of all persons

• Majority rule/minority rights

• Necessity of compromise

• Individual freedom

(Comprehension)

5.      9-12.C.1.5. Students are able to describe the state, local, and

tribal governments with emphasis on their structures,

functions, and powers.

• State

• Local – divisions (county, city, townships)

• Tribes – reservations, tribal constitutions, governments

Example: Nine South Dakota reservations with separate

constitutions and government.

(Application)

                 6.    9-12.C.1.6. Students are able to describe the elements of how

U.S. foreign policy is created.

Examples: Monroe Doctrine, Roosevelt Corollary, Iran-

Contra

Indicator 2: Analyze the constitutional rights and responsibilities of United States

citizens.

Bloom’s Taxonomy

Level Standard, Supporting Skills, and Examples

(Application)

7.      9-12.C.2.1. Students are able to describe the means of

influencing and/or participating in a republic.

• Describe the roles of the citizen in the legislative and

electoral process

Examples: the right to vote, referendum, initiative, recall

• Describe the benefits, duties, and responsibilities of

citizenship in the United States.

Example: volunteerism benefits and rewards -Native

Americans enlisting in the military

• Explain the nature and functions of major and minor

political parties, interest groups, and media on the

political process.

• Describe the campaign and election process for national,

state, and local offices.

• Describe the Electoral College process.

(Comprehension)

8.      9-12.C.2.2. Students are able to interpret the meaning of basic

constitutional rights guaranteed to citizens.

• Bill of Rights and other amendments

(Comprehension)

9.      9-12.C.2.3. Students are able to describe the process of

naturalization.

• Describe the benefits, duties, and responsibilities of

citizenship in the United States.

Core High School Civics (Government)

Performance Descriptors

1.      Advanced

·         High school students performing at the advanced level will:

• explain strengths and weaknesses of various forms of

government worldwide;

• analyze the influence of major historical documents and ideals

on the formation of the United States government.

2.      Proficient

·         High school students performing at the proficient level will:

• explain the characteristics of various forms of government;

• determine the influence of major historical documents and

ideals on the formation of the United States government;

• explain the principles of American Constitutional government

and how they are realized in its structures and functions;

• describe the state, local, and tribal governments with emphasis

on their structures, functions, and powers;

• describe the means of influencing and participating in a

republic;

• identify the meaning of basic constitutional rights guaranteed

to citizens;

• describe the process of naturalization.

3.      Basic

·         High school students performing at the basic level will:

• list the two main forms of government worldwide;

• list the three branches of government in the U.S.;

• list the three levels of federalism;

• explain how to register and where to vote;

• list three of the five guarantees in the First Amendment.

CIVICS (GOVERNMENT) STANDARDS 9-12

Indicator 1: Analyze forms and purposes of government in relationship to the

needs of citizens and societies including the impact of historical events, ideals, and

documents.

I.                    Core HS Standards

1.      9-12.C.1.1. (Analysis) Explain the characteristics of various forms of government.

2.      9-12.C.1.2. (Evaluation) Determine the influence of major historical documents and ideals on the

formation of the United States government.

3.      9-12.C.1.3. (Knowledge) Identify the principles of the American Constitution.

4.      9-12.C.1.4. (Comprehension) Explain the principles of American democracy.

5.      9-12.C.1.5. (Comprehension) Describe the state, local, and tribal governments with emphasis on

their structures, functions, and powers.

6.      9-12.C.1.6. (Application) Describe the elements of how U.S. foreign policy is created.

II.                Advanced HS Standards

1.      9-12.C.1.1A. (Evaluation) Compare the United States’ political systems with those of major

democratic and authoritarian nations in terms of the structures and powers of political

institutions.

Indicator 2: Analyze the constitutional rights and responsibilities of United States

citizens.

I.                   Core HS Standards

1.      9-12.C.2.1. (Application) Describe the means of influencing and/or participating in a republic.

2.      9-12.C.2.2. (Comprehension) Interpret the meaning of basic constitutional rights guaranteed to

citizens.

3.      9-12.C.2.3. (Comprehension) Describe the process of naturalization.

II.                Advanced HS Standards

1.      9-12.C.2.1A. (Analysis) Enumerate the basic constitutional rights guaranteed to citizens and their

related impacts on society.

2.      9-12.C.2.2A. (Analysis) Analyze and explain the purpose of politics/political activity and the

related implications for United States citizens.

3.      9-12.C.2.3A. (Analysis) Identify various issues involving individual rights and responsibilities in

relation to the general welfare.

4.      9-12.C.2.4A. (Analysis) Analyze campaigns for national, state, and local elective office,

including the nominating process, campaign funding and spending, and the influence of media

coverage, including campaign advertising and public opinion polls.

 

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